Railtown 1897 State Historic Park


Home to the Historic Jamestown Shops and Roundhouse

Hours of Operation

Open Daily (November-March, 10:00am-3:00pm; April-October, 9:30am-4:30pm)

Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day.

Trains operate every Saturday and Sunday from April-September, 10:30am, 12:00pm, 1:30pm & 3:00pm

THE POLAR EXPRESS™ Train Ride trains run in December, click here for more details.

Railtown 1897 SHP
PO Box 1250 / 10501 Reservoir Road
Jamestown, CA 95327
(209) 984-3953

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Coach No. 2

 

Coach No. 2 was built in 1869 by the Wason Manufacturing Company as Central Pacific Railroad No. 43 and used on the overland immigrant trains. By the 1890s the car, now renumbered to No. 1133, was used in San Francisco East Bay commute service by Southern Pacific. The car was then sold to the Ocean Shore Railroad in 1912 and found its way to the Hetch Hetchy Railroad sometime around 1920. It migrated to the Sierra Railroad around 1930 for use in movie work.

 

 Combine No. 5

 

Combine (combination baggage car - coach) No. 5 was built by W.L. Holman & Co. of San Francisco in 1902 for use on the Angels Branch. The car is 32 feet long over buffers for use on the tight curves and clearances of the Angels Branch. The car was built with seats for 10, expanded to 14 passengers in 1912, and a section for baggage and mail. After the Angels Branch was abandoned  in 1935, the car was used as a caboose until about 1960.

   

Coach No. 6

 

Coach No. 6 was built by W.L. Holman & Co. of San Francisco in 1902 for use on the Angels Branch. Similar to car No. 5, No. 6 is 32 feet long over buffers with seating for 32 passengers along with a Spear heater and a toilet. It was transferred to the Hecth Hetchy Railroad circa 1936. The car then went to the Pacific Coast Chapter of the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society (PCC-R&LHS) in 1949. It was on display at the California State Railroad Museum in Sacramento between 1979 and 1989 when it was returned to Jamestown.

 

 Caboose No. 7

 

Caboose No. 7 was built for Midwestern carrier Elgin Joilet & Eastern circa 1923. It was purchased by the Sierra Railroad circa 1956. Plywood siding was applied to the car in 1962. The tongue and groove wood siding was restored in 1989 and the car went through a complete restoration in 2010. No. 7 is most famous for its use in the film “Back to the Future III.”

  

Combine  - Caboose No. 9


Jim Wren photo - Ken Rattenne Collection

 

This unique car was built by the Sierra Railroad in their Jamestown shops in 1914 as a passenger coach and baggage car with a caboose-style cupola. Car No. 9 is 39 feet long, originally had seating for 22 passengers and was built for use on the Jamestown to Tuolumne mixed train. The car was leased to the Southern Pacific during WWII where cast steel trucks replaced the original arch bar trucks. Upon its return to the Sierra, it experienced a roll-over accident resulting in a new cupola with a rounded roof. It was used in movie service until it was damaged in a 1975 switching accident. The car is currently under restoration. 

 

 Coach No. 11

 

No. 11 was built by the Pullman Company in 1910 as Union Pacific subsidiary Oregon Short Line as No. 98, eventually being renumbered to 683 circa 1915. The car was purchased by 20th Century Fox for movie work circa 1945. It was purchased by Sierra Railroad in 1972 as No. 11 for excursion service.

  

Coach No. 12

 

Built by the Pullman Company in 1923 as Southern Pacific suburban coach No. 2139 for service on the San Francisco Peninsula commute service, the car came to the Sierra Railroad in 1973 for excursion service and was renumbered to No. 12.  

 

 Coach No. 14

 

Built by the Pullman Company in 1923 as Southern Pacific suburban coach No. 2140 for service on the San Francisco Peninsula commute service, the car came to the Sierra Railroad in 1974 for excursion service and was renumbered to No. 14. The car was refurbished in 1997.

 

Coach No. 15

Built by the Pullman Company in 1923 as Southern Pacific suburban coach No. 2098 for service on the San Francisco Peninsula commute service; it came to the Sierra Railroad in 1974 for excursion service and was renumbered to No. 15. (No photo)

 

 Baggage Car No. 17

 

No. 17 was originally built as a combination and coach-baggage car in 1923 by American Car & Foundry for the Pittsburg & West Virginia in 1938. It was sold to Canadian National's American subsidiary Grand Trunk Western and converted to GTW baggage car No. 8810. It went to the White Mountain Scenic Railroad in Arizona about 1965 and brought to the Sierra Railroad about 1977 and renumbered to No. 17. It was used as a dance car in excursion trains and is currently stored in the Sierra Railway's backshop area near the Tri-Dam building.

   

Mountain Observation Cars No. 597 and 599


Photo courtesy of Ken Rattenne

 

Originally built as day coaches Nos. 1422 and 1424 for the Canadian Pacific in 1914, the coaches were rebuilt as mountain observation cars and traversed the Canadian Rockies by day. These popular cars came to Railtown in 1975 and 1971 respectively for use on excursion trains. Car No. 597 was rebuilt as a bar and toilet car about 1978. 

 

 Lounge-Coach No. 2901


Photo courtesy of Ken Rattenne

 

Built by Pullman in 1910 for luxury service on Southern Pacific trains such as the “Overland Limited,” the car originally had an all wood body and underframe. It was rebuilt with steel sides and underframe in 1928. Its last main line use was on SP's "Suntan Special" to Santa Cruz in the early 1950s. The car was donated to the Central Coast Chapter of National Railway Historical Society in 1956. The Sierra Railroad purchased it in 1971.